OMICS International Organises 3000+ Global Conferenceseries Events Every Year across USA, Europe & Asia with support from 1000 more scientific societies and Publishes 700+ Open access journals which contains over 50000 eminent personalities, reputed scientists as editorial board members.
For more Conferences visit www.conferenceseries.com

Back

Biography

Jennifer Seyler has nearly 15 years’ experience in nutrition and fitness communications. As a dietitian and personal trainer, she has leveraged her knowledge to help 40 plus brands, including Gatorade and Abbott Nutrition, translate science and spread respective messages to the audiences that matters most to them. She has published more than 20 scientific articles and has been cited as an expert in publications such as Parents, iVillage and Today’s Dietitian. She is a Chicago Food and Nutrition Network Board Member, the Illinois Academy of Nutrition and Dietetics President-Elect, and the Health Influencer Communications Vice President for FleishmanHillard

Abstract

Science is a foundational building block that helps guide consumer nutrition and physical activity recommendations. But these guidelines are often misrepresented or misunderstood, which can lead to confusion. Health professionals have a duty to provide evidence-based information to ensure user safety and maintain credibility. But, no matter how ‘late breaking,’ ‘novel’ or ‘supported’ the science is, if the audience doesn’t hear what you are saying or what you mean to say, it isn’t going to get applied or it may be applied improperly. To ensure your audience understands the science and the best way to apply it, you – the health professional – need to understand the best ways to evaluate, translate and promote the science in a way that ensures the information is going to the person intended, is as clear as possible, and maintains the credibility it deserves. This presentation will discuss 1) what the media considers news, 2) the nutrition/fitness landscape, 3) the importance of knowing your audience, and 4) ways to evaluate, translate and promote science.