- Point tenderness at greater trochanter: The patient is in standing or supine position. Point tenderness is elicited at the ipsilateral greater trochanter. If lateral hip pain is elicited Greater trochanteric pain syndrome may be present.
- Resisted internal rotation test: The patient is in the supine position and the affected hip at 45° flexion and maximal external rotation. The test result is as positive if the patient indicates replication of symptoms over the greater trochanter on resisted active internal rotation. If lateral hip pain is elicited, Greater trochanteric pain syndrome may be present.
- Resisted active abduction: The patient is in the supine position with the affected hip at 45° abduction. A positive test results if the patient indicates replication of symptoms over the greater trochanter on resisted active abduction. If lateral hip pain is elicited, Greater trochanteric pain syndrome may be present.
- Ober’s testing: The patient is in the lateral position with the unaffected side down. The affected leg is passively extended and lowered to the table. If lateral hip pain is elicited or iliotibial band tightness,  Iliotibial band syndrome may be present.
- Patrick (Fabere) testing: The patient is in the supine position with the affected leg flexed, abducted, and externally rotated with the ankle resting on the thigh of the unaffected leg. One hand is placed on the anterior superior iliac spine of the unaffected side, while the other hand applies downward pressure on the affected leg. The test result is positive if the patient indicates pain about the affected hip. Pain may also be elicited at or about the sacroiliac joint indicating sacroiliac joint dysfunction.
- Gillet’s test: The patient stands with the feet apart and the clinician places one thumb on the posterior superior iliac spine (PSIS) of the side to be tested and the other thumb on the sacral base. The patient flexes the hip and knee to 90° on the side being tested. The test result is positive if the PSIS moves superiorly, Sacroiliac joint dysfunction may be present.
- Thomas test: The patient lies supine and flexes the unaffected hip, holding the knee to the chest. The test result is positive if the patient’s other leg will rise off the table, Sacroiliac joint dysfunction may be present.
- Trendelenburg’s testing: The patient stands on the affected leg and raises the unaffected leg to 30–90°. A pelvic tilt below the level of the stance side indicates a positive test, Gluteus medius muscle dysfunction may be present.
- Straight leg raise: The patient lies supine and the affected extremity raised straight up. The test result is positive if the patient complains of pain in the extremity (not the back) typically in a specific nerve root distribution, Lumbar radiculopathy may be present.
Table 4: Common Tests Utilized in Evaluation of Lateral Hip Pain.