Study, Year

Country

Sample

Cases
(n)

Overall and type-specific prevalence, n (%)

 

 

 

 

Any HPV

16

18

31

33

35

39

45

51

52

59

67

6

11

12

Multiple

Europe

St Guily et al., 2011 [32]

France

PE

185

106
(57%)

94
(89%)

3
(3%)

1
(1%)

4
(4%)

1
(1%)

3
(3%)

 

1
(1%)

5
(5%)

 

 

 

 

 

8
(8%)

Hannisdal et al., 2010 [33]

Norway

PE

137

71
(52%)

64
(90%)

3 (4%)

2 (3%)

1 (1%)

 

 

 

 

 

 

1 (1%)

 

 

 

2
(3%)

Näsman et al., 2009 [3]

Sweden

PE

98

83 (85%)1

77
(93%)

 

 

1
(1%)

1
(1%)

 

 

 

 

1
(1%)

 

 

 

 

 

Hammarstedt et al., 2006 [34]

Sweden

PE

203

99 (49%)2

86
(87%)

 

 

3
(6%)

1
(2%)

 

1 (2%)

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Mellin et al.,
2002 [40]

Sweden

FF

22

12
(55%)

11
(92%)

 

 

1
(8%)

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Klussmann et al., 2001 [36]

Germany

PE

24

14
(58%)

13
(93%)

 

 

1
(7%)

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

2
(14%)3

Mellin et al.,
2000 [35]

Sweden

PE

60

26
(43%)

26
(100%)

 

 

1
(4%)

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

1
(4%)

Andl et al.,
1998 [37]

Germany

FF

21

11
(52%)

8
(73%)

 

 

1
(9%)

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Snijders et al.,1992 [38]

Holland

FF

10

10
(100%)

4
(40%)

 

 

4
(40%)

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

1
(10%)

Niedobitek et al., 1990 [39]

England

PE

28

6
(21%)

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

North America

Luginbuhl, et al., 2009 [41]

USA

PE

48

17
(35%)

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Pintos et al.,
2008 [14]

Canada

Brush/ gargle4

215

9
(43%)

All 9 positive samples were high-risk types. No further type-specific data provided.

 

Ernster et al.,
2007 [42]

USA

PE

34

22
(65%)

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Strome et al.,
2002 [43]

USA

PE

52

24
(46%)

21 (88%)

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

1
(4%)

 

 

 

2
(8%)

 

Ringström et al., 2002 [44]

USA

FF

11

7
(64%)

7
(100%)

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Paz et al.,
1997 [45]

USA

FF

15

9
(60%)

8
(89%)

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Asia

Chien et al.,
2008 [18]

Taiwan

PE

111

14
(13%)

10
(71%)

5 (36%)

1
(7%)

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

1
(7%)

1
(7%)

 

4
(29%)

Li et al.,
2003 [19]

China6

PE

16

0

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Oceania

Li et al.,
2003 [19]

Australiaf

PE

67

317
(46%)

28
(90%)

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

1Three of the HPV-positive samples were not typable by sequencing.
2Seven of the HPV-positive samples were not typable by sequencing. Of further note, the HPV prevalence varied across time periods as follows: in 1970’s 7/30 (23%) were
HPV-positive, in 1980’s 12/42 (29%), in 1990’s 48/84 (57%), and in 2000 to 2002, 32/47 (68%).
3HPV5b was isolated with HPV16, and in another case ADX1 with HPV16. HPV5b and ADX1 are cutaneous types.
4Brush sample obtained by swabbing multiple sites in the buccal cavity, was combined with a gargle specimen.
5Includes both palatine tonsil and back of tongue cases. No data given for palatine tonsil alone.
6Li et al. (AJP, 2003) have studied HPV prevalence in TSCC in China and in Australia. The same methods were used, except the FAP59/64 primer set was only used on
the Chinese samples. Part of the Australian data is presented elsewhere (Li et al., Int J Cancer, 2003 and Li et al., Head and Neck, 2003).
7Three cases were positive for HPV by GP5+/6+ PCR but were not typable by sequencing. The authors suggest that multiple types or novel types were present in these
samples.
Table 1: Overall and type-specific prevalence of HPV in tonsillar squamous cell carcinoma by geographic location and study. The type-specific prevalence represents types in either single or multiple infections. Only mucosal HPV types have been presented in the table. In certain cases the HPV type could not be identified. (PE = paraffin embedded, FF = fresh frozen).