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Lobular Carcinoma In Situ

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  • Lobular carcinoma in situ

    Lobular carcinoma in situ (LCIS) is an area (or areas) of abnormal cell growth that increases a person’s risk of developing invasive breast cancer later on in life. Lobular means that the abnormal cells start growing in the lobules, the milk-producing glands at the end of breast ducts. Carcinoma refers to any cancer that begins in the skin or other tissues that cover internal organs — such as breast tissue. In situ or “in its original place” means that the abnormal growth remains inside the lobule and does not spread to surrounding tissues. 

  • Lobular carcinoma in situ

    Symptoms of LCIS : LCIS usually does not cause any signs or symptoms, such as a lump or other visible changes to the breast. LCIS may not always show up on a screening mammogram. One reason is that LCIS often lacks microcalcifications, the tiny specks of calcium that form within other types of breast cancer cells. On a mammogram, microcalcifications show up as white specks. It’s believed that many cases of LCIS simply go undiagnosed, and they may never cause any problems. 

  • Lobular carcinoma in situ

    Research: With median follow-up of 15.8 years, 1273 women developed BC. The majority of BCs were invasive (81%), of which 61% were ductal, 13% were mixed ductal/lobular, and 14% werelobular. Approximately two-thirds of the BC cases were intermediate or high grade, and 29% were lymph node positive. Cancer characteristics were similar across the 3 histologic categories of BBD, with a similar frequency of ductal carcinoma in situ, invasive disease, tumor size, time to invasive BC, histologic type of BC, lymph node positivity, and human epidermal growth factor receptor 2 positivity. 

  • Lobular carcinoma in situ

    We identified by array CGH and confirmed by FISH a gain in the 17q25.3 genomic region in 90% of the BRCA1 mutated tumors. This chromosomal gain was present in only 28.6% of the BRCA1 non-mutated TNBC, 26.7% of the unscreened TNBC, 13.6% of the luminal B, 19.0% of the HER2+ and 0% of the luminal A breast cancers. The 17q25.3 gain was also detected in 50% of the TNBC with BRCA1 promoter methylation. Interestingly, BRCA1 promoter methylation was never detected in BRCA1 mutated BC.

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