alexa MRSA [Methicillin Resistant Staphylococcus aureus] | Belgium | PDF | PPT| Case Reports | Symptoms | Treatment

OMICS International organises 3000+ Global Conferenceseries Events every year across USA, Europe & Asia with support from 1000 more scientific societies and Publishes 700+ Open Access Journals which contains over 50000 eminent personalities, reputed scientists as editorial board members.

Recommended Conferences

Read more

Recommended Journals

Relevant Topics

MRSA [Methicillin Resistant Staphylococcus Aureus]

  • Share this page
  • Facebook
  • Twitter
  • LinkedIn
  • Google+
  • Pinterest
  • Blogger
  • MRSA [Methicillin Resistant Staphylococcus aureus]

    Pathophysiology:
    Methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) is a bacterium responsible for several difficult-to-treat infections in humans. It is also called oxacillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (ORSA). Healthy individuals may carry MRSA asymptomatically for periods ranging from a few weeks to many years. Patients with compromised immune systems are at a significantly greater risk of symptomatic secondary infection.

  • MRSA [Methicillin Resistant Staphylococcus aureus]

    Statistics:
    Consecutive S. aureus blood culture isolates from patients with bacteremia in Belgium hospital were collected. SCCmec, multilocus sequence typing (MLST), and spa typing were performed. Among 172 HCWs included, the proportions of S. aureus and MRSA nasal carriage during first sampling were 22.7 % and 8.7 %, respectively. From 160 HCWs who were sampled three times, 12.5 % (20/160) were persistent S. aureus carriers and 26.9 % (43/160) were intermittent carriers.

  • MRSA [Methicillin Resistant Staphylococcus aureus]

    Treatment:
    Healthcare providers can treat many S. aureus skin infections by draining the abscess or boil and may not need to use antibiotics. Draining of skin boils or abscesses should only be done by a healthcare provider. For mild to moderate skin infections, incision and drainage by a healthcare provider is the first-line treatment.

  • MRSA [Methicillin Resistant Staphylococcus aureus]

    Major Research:
    Some in vitro studies with honey have identified components in honey that kill MRSA.
    Ocean-dwelling living sponges produce compounds that may make MRSA more susceptible to antibiotics.

Expert PPTs

Speaker PPTs

 

High Impact List of Articles

Conference Proceedings

adwords