alexa Adaptation and Validation of the Standardized Assessment of Personality

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Adaptation and Validation of the Standardized Assessment of Personality

The prevalence of people with Personality Disorders (PDs) is fairly high even in the general population where it ranges from 3 to 15% [1,2]. In psychiatric populations, its prevalence is about 30% among outpatients [3], 40% among inpatients [4] and up to 70% in prison psychiatric populations [5]. Patients suffering from depression, substance abuse and/or eating disorders account for the highest proportion of PDs. In the fields of both primary health care and psychiatric care, patients with comorbid PDs experience poorer treatment outcomes (for recent epidemiologic studies, see [6,7]). Several studies have suggested that patients with cormorbid PDs require specific treatment (For depression: [8,9]; For eating disorders: [10]; For substance dependency: [11]).
 
The identification of PDs has therefore been the subject of considerable research and a wide range of screening tests, inventories and standardized interviews are now available. Various standardized interviews exist for the diagnosis of PDs: The Structured Clinical Interview for DSM-IV Personality Disorders (SCID-II) [12], The Structured Interview for DSM Personality-IV (SIDP-IV) [13], and the International Personality Disorder Examination (IPDE) [14]. Although a number of interviews or self-rated questionnaires are also used for PD screening, the number of interviews specifically designed for PD screening is limited: the Personality Assessment Schedule – Rapid version (PAS-R) (30 items, 10 minutes to complete) [15] and the Standardized Assessment of Personality – Abbreviated Scale (SAPAS) (8 items, 5 minutes to complete) [16]. Most screening measures are based on the use of self-rated questionnaires, e.g., the Personality Diagnostic Questionnaire (PDQ 4+) (99 items, 20 minutes to complete) [17-20], the DSM-IV and ICQ-10 Personality Questionnaire (DIP-Q) (140 items, 20 minutes to complete) [21,22], the SCID-II Screen (115 items, 20 minutes to complete) [12], the IPDEQ (screen) from the IPDE (DSM-IV version 77 items, ICD-10 version : 59 items, 20 minutes to complete) [14]; the Personality Assessment Screener (PAS) (22 items, 5 minutes to complete) [23,24]; The Personality Disorder Screening (PDS) (12 items, 5 minutes to complete) [25]; the Iowa Personality Disorder Screen (IPDS) (11 items, 5 minutes to complete) [26-28]; the Personality Disorder Screening – Short Version (PSS-K) (8 items, 5 minutes to complete) [29]; and the Standardized Assessment of Personality – Abbreviated Scale Self-Report (SAPAS-SR) (8 items, 5 minutes to complete) [30].
 
With reference more specifically to the use of trait personality questionnaires for PD identification, a recent study [31] compared the screening capacity for PDs of a categorical screen test, the SAPASSR [30], with that of a trait personality screen test, namely the NEOFFI (short version of the NEO-PI-R). The authors showed that the NEO-FFI, which is based on the Five Factor Model, one of the most widely used models of trait personality to study normal personality, had a poor screening capacity for PDs. Originally created by Costa and McCrae (1985), its latest version is known as the NEO-PI-3 [32]. Many articles have discussed the assessment of PDs using the Big Five model [33-36]. Obviously, this model does not seem to be the best choice for PD screening even though it is undoubtedly useful for gaining a better understanding of patients and their afflictions. It is widely acknowledged that research into personality would benefit from a better classification of PDs [6].

Citation: Merlhiot G, Mondillon L, Vermeulen N, Basu A, Mermillod M (2014) Adaptation and Validation of the Standardized Assessment of Personality– Abbreviated Scale as a Self-Administered Screening Test (SA-SAPAS). J Psychol Psychother 4:164. doi: 10.4172/2161-0487.1000164 

 
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