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Andrew D. Badley

Andrew D. Badley

Director HIV Immunology Lab, Professor of Medicine
Mayo Clinic and Foundation, USA
Tel: (507) 284-2511

Biography

Andrew D. Badley, M.D., was born in Sydney, Nova Scotia, Canada. He earned his B.S. degree in 1985 and M.D. degree in 1990, both from Dalhousie University in Halifax, Nova Scotia. After completing residency training in internal medicine at Mayo Clinic in Rochester, Minn., in 1994, Dr. Badley completed further training at Mayo Clinic as a clinician investigator trainee in the Division of Infectious Diseases in 1997. During his training, Dr. Badley received the Dr. J. Geraci Award for Excellence in Infectious Diseases from Mayo Clinic in June 1997, as well as the Young Investigator Award from the Interscience Conference on Antimicrobial Agents and Chemotherapy and American Society for Microbiology (ICAAC/ASM) in September 1997. Dr. Badley joined the staff of Ottawa Hospital in Ottawa, Ontario, Canada, in 1997 as an assistant professor in the Division of Infectious Diseases and in 2002 was promoted to an associate professor. In 2002, Dr. Badley returned to Mayo Clinic in Rochester as a consultant in the Division of Infectious Diseases and brought with him his successful research program. At Mayo Clinic, Dr. Badley is currently a professor of medicine and consultant in the Division of Infectious Diseases; associate director of the Research Resources component of the Center for Translational Science Activities; and theme leader for infectious disease research on the Research Development Council, an internal Mayo committee.

Research

virus-host interactions, in particular how viral proteins modify the host immune response and/or cell survival.