Addiction, Opioids, Substance Abuse and Recovery

Addiction, Opioids, Substance Abuse and Recovery

Addiction is a physical or psychological need to do, take or use something, to the point where it could be harmful to you. Addiction is a condition in which a person engages in the use of a substance or in a behaviour for which the rewarding effects provide a compelling incentive to repeatedly pursue the behaviour despite detrimental consequences. Opioids trigger the release of endorphins, your brain's feel-good neurotransmitters. Endorphins muffle your perception of pain and boost feelings of pleasure, creating a temporary but powerful sense of well-being. When you take opioids repeatedly over time, your body slows its production of endorphins. The same dose of opioids stops triggering such a strong flood of good feelings. This is called tolerance. Opioid use can lead to addiction and, too often, overdose. Opioids are safest when used for three or fewer days to manage acute pain, such as pain that follows surgery or a bone fracture. Developing a drug addiction isn’t a character flaw or a sign of weakness and it takes more than willpower to overcome the problem. For many people struggling with addiction, the toughest step toward recovery is the very first one: recognizing that you have a problem and deciding to make a change.

  • Detoxification
  • Addictive Personality
  • Tolerance and Withdrawal
  • Physical Addiction
  • Alcohol Addiction
  • Prescription Drug Addiction
  • Use of New Technology in Mental Health Education
  • Mental Health, Awareness and Development
  • Psychological Addiction

 

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