Anaesthetics Impact on Brain

Yearly utmost of people distressed by disorders of the central nervous system (CNS) undergo various diagnostic, therapeutic and surgical procedures requiring administration of anaesthetic agents. Anaesthetics exert their anaesthetic, amnesic and analgesic effects by acting on multiple neuronal membrane proteins in the CNS. While some of the causal anaesthetic targets have been identified, many anaesthetic targets remain unknown.

The consequent long-term effect of anaesthetic agents on expression of these various molecular targets has been implicated in mediating potentially long-lasting adverse effects. Recent work suggested that the effects of general anaesthetics may not be entirely reversible, with animal studies demonstrating persistent changes in CNS protein expression post recovery from anesthesia. Age-associated or disease-induced alterations in the CNS can profoundly alter multiple aspects of brain structure, biochemistry, and function. Such maladaptive changes in the brain can render it increasingly vulnerable to the effects of various anaesthetics. The selection of appropriate anesthesia drugs and protocol is mandatory, especially in individuals with pre-existing CNS disorders, to maximize anesthesia efficiency, avoid occurrence of adverse events, and ensure patient safety.

  • Parkinson’s disease
  • Alzheimer’s disease
  • Huntington’s disease
  • Intra cerebral hemorrhage
  • Cerebral amyloid angioplasty

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