Antibiotics Drug Discovery

Antibiotics are medications used to treat – and, in some cases, prevent – bacterial infections. They can be used to treat relatively mild conditions such as acne, as well as potentially life-threatening conditions such as pneumonia. However, antibiotics often have no benefit for many other types of infection. Using them unnecessarily would only increase the risk of antibiotic resistance, so they are not routinely used.

Types of antibiotics

There are now hundreds of different types of antibiotics, but most of them can be broadly classified into six groups. These are outlined below.

  • penicillin – widely used to treat a variety of infections, including skin infections, chest infections and urinary tract infections
  • cephalosporins – can be used to treat a wide range of infections, but are also effective for treating more serious infections, such as septicaemia and meningitis
  • aminoglycosides – tend to only be used to treat very serious illnesses such as septicaemia, as they can cause serious side effects, including hearing loss and kidney damage; they break down quickly inside the digestive system, so they have to be given by injection, but are also used as drops for some ear or eye infections
  • tetracyclines – can be used to treat a wide range of infections; commonly used to treat moderate to severe acne and rosacea, which causes flushing of the skin and spots
  • macrolides – can be particularly useful for treating lung and chest infections; can also be a useful alternative for people with a penicillin allergy or to treat penicillin-resistant strains of bacteria
  • fluoroquinolones – broad-spectrum antibiotics that can be used to treat a wide range of infections

    Related Conference of Antibiotics Drug Discovery

    November 09-11, 2017

    4th European Biopharma Congress

    Vienna, Austria
    August 20-22, 2018

    9th Asian Biologics and Biosimilars Congress

    Tokyo, Japan

    Antibiotics Drug Discovery Conference Speakers

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