Antimicrobial resistance and its emergence

The use of antimicrobials in animals closely parallels their discovery and usage in humans.  Sulfonamide was the first antimicrobial to be introduced to food animal medicine in the 1940s. Antimicrobial resistance emerges from the use of antimicrobials in animals and the subsequent transfer of resistance genes and bacteria among animals and animal products and the environment.  Antibiotics are also given to food animals for growth promotion and prophylactic medication. In 2011, a total of 13.6 million kilograms of antimicrobials were sold for use in food-producing animals in the United States, which represents 80% of all antibiotics sold or distributed in the United States. Of the antibiotics given to animals from 2009 through 2013, just above 60% distributed for food animal use are "medically-important" drugs, that are also used in humans.

  • Molecular mechanism of resistance
  • A public approach to antimicrobial resistance
  • Bacterial antibiotic resistance
  • New drugs for emerging diseases
  • Alternate strategy to overcome the problem of antimicrobial resistance

Related Conference of Antimicrobial resistance and its emergence

Antimicrobial resistance and its emergence Conference Speakers