Blood Malignancies

Blood malignancies are forms of cancer that begins in the cells of blood-forming tissue, such as the bone marrow, or in the cells of the immune system. Examples of hematologic cancer are acute and chronic leukaemia, lymphomas, multiple myeloma and myelodysplastic syndromes. Myeloproliferative neoplasms, or MPNs, are hematologic cancers that arise from malignant hematopoietic myeloid progenitor cells in the bone marrow, such as the precursor cells of red cells, platelets and granulocytes. The other types of Blood Malignancies also include sarcoma, lymphodema, Non-Hodgkin lymphoma (NHL) and lymphoma, lymphoid cancer, bone marrow cancer.

 

A blood cancer or haematological malignancy is a type of malignant cancer that originates, affects, or involves the blood, bone marrow, or lymph nodes. These cancers include leukemias, Sarcomas,lymphomas, and myelomas. These particular types of cancers can arise as defected mature cell types that have differentiated from hematopoietic precursor cells (often in the bone marrow) and begin to quickly proliferate through the bloodstream where it can then often infiltrate other organs and tissues. 

  • Sarcoma
  • Lymphodema
  • Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma (NHL)
  • Hodgkin Lymphoma
  • Bone Marrow Cancer
  • Lymphoid Cancer

Related Conference of Blood Malignancies

Blood Malignancies Conference Speakers