Breast Cancer Staging

\r\n Breast cancer staging describes how much cancer is in the body which is treated with chemotherapy, hormone therapy, and drugs. It has both medical and pathologic staging systems for breast cancer. The pathologic stage also called the medical stage is determined by examining tissue removed during an operation. If surgery is not conceivable, sometimes right away cancer will be given a clinical stage instead. Imaging tests like x-rays, CT scans, MRIs, ultrasound, and PET scans may also give information about how much and where cancer is in the body. In the system called TNM, every cancer is assigned a letter or number to describe the tumor, node, and metastases. T stands for the original tumor, where T category gives information about aspects of the original (primary) tumor, such as its size whether it has grown into nearby tissues. N stands for nodes where category describes whether cancer has spread into nearby lymph nodes and M stands for metastasis in which this category tells whether cancer has spread to distant parts of the body. In stage grouping, once the values for T, N, and M have been determined, they are combined to assign an overall stage.

\r\n

\r\n  

\r\n

    Related Conference of Breast Cancer Staging

    Breast Cancer Staging Conference Speakers