Cancer Research & Cancer vaccines

The goal of the Cancer Research Program is to make significant improvements in the prevention, early detection, diagnosis and treatment of cancer. It will continue to translate basic research findings into clinical applications together with strategic partners, with the National Centre for Tumor Diseases (NCT) and the nationally active German Consortium for Translational Cancer Research (DKTK) playing key roles. Most of us know about vaccines given to healthy people to help prevent infections, such as measles and chicken pox. These vaccines use weakened or killed germs like viruses or bacteria to start an immune response in the body. Getting the immune system ready to defend against these germs helps keep people from getting infections. Most cancer vaccines work the same way, but they make the person’s immune system attack cancer cells.

Cancer research ranges from epidemiology, molecular bioscience to the performance of clinical trials to evaluate and compare applications of the various cancer treatments. These applications include surgery, radiation therapy, chemotherapy, hormone therapy, Immunotherapy and combined treatment modalities such as chemo-radiotherapy. Cancer preventive vaccines target infectious agents that cause or contribute to the development of cancer . They are similar to traditional vaccines, which help prevent infectious diseases, such as measles or polio, by protecting the body against infection. Both cancer preventive vaccines and traditional vaccines are based on antigens that are carried by infectious agents and that are relatively easy for the immune system to recognize as foreign.

  • Clinical Cancer Research
  • Molecular Cancer Research
  • Cancer Prevention Research
  • Vaccines Treatment
  • Immune response
  • Out comes
  • New Cacer Vaccines

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Cancer Research & Cancer vaccines Conference Speakers