Clinical Trails and Dosage Studies

A clinical trial is an examination program led with patients to evaluate a new treatment or medication. The motivation behind clinical preliminaries is to discover better strategies for treating, screening and diagnosing distinctive ailments. Clinical trials are responsible for the wide application of the latest scientific and technological advances to patient care. Each clinical trial has criteria describing the participants. Children, adults, healthy volunteers, patients and people of a diverse group of ethnic and racial foundations are urged to participate in clinical trials. Clinical preliminaries are partitioned into 4 stages, called clinical trial phases. The first two phase trials assess the drug for its lethality or the side effects it causes and later phase trials aim to test a new drug for its efficiency than the existing medications. Each new phase of a clinical preliminary expands data from past stages. A dose-ranging study is a part of phase II clinical trial where different doses of a drug molecule are tested to establish which dose is effective with least or no lethality. The dose-response relationships in clinical trials are necessary for determining the safe quantity of drugs. Thus the vast data accumulated by clinical trials form the basis for public policy and drug approval process. Once the drug enters the market it is subjected to post-market drug safety surveillance to assess further problems.

  • Preclinical research
  • Phases of clinical trial
  • Drug approval process
  • Pharmacokinetic and pharmacodynamics dosage studies
  • Post-market drug safety monitoring

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