Colorectal Cancer

Colorectal cancer is a term for cancer that starts in either the colon or the rectum. Colon cancer and rectal cancer have many features in common. Colon cancer and cancer of the rectum can begin as a small polyp, detectable through regular cancer screening, such as colonoscopy. Colon cancer symptoms include a change in bowel habits or bleeding, but often there are no symptoms. With early detection, surgery, radiation, and/or chemotherapy can be effective treatment. Rectal cancer begins in the rectum. It’s also called colorectal cancer because it can occur above the rectum, in the colon or in the rectum. Some people are at higher risk because of a family history of certain genetic disorders such as Lynch syndrome. Colon cancer is a type of cancer that begins in the colon, an organ that is part of the large intestine and the body’s digestive system. Small intestine cancer, also known as small bowel cancer, begins in cells of the small intestine, the part of the digestive system located between the stomach and large intestine. It’s rare, affecting about 9,000 people a year in the United States.  

The colon and rectum are part of the large intestine. Colorectal cancer occurs when tumors form in the lining of the large intestine. It is common in both men and women. The risk of developing colorectal cancer rises after age 50.

Symptoms of colorectal cancer include

  • Diarrhea or constipation
  • A feeling that your bowel does not empty completely
  • Blood (either bright red or very dark) in your stool
  • Stools that are narrower than usual
  • Frequent gas pains or cramps, or feeling full or bloated
  • Weight loss with no known reason
  • Fatigue
  • Nausea or vomiting

Because you may not have symptoms at first, it's important to have screening tests. Everyone over 50 should get screened. 

  • Colorectal screening
  • Colorectal tumours
  • Colorectal malignancy
  • Colorectal polyps
  • Colon Cancer
  • Rectal Cancer

Related Conference of Colorectal Cancer

Colorectal Cancer Conference Speakers