Dementia

Dementia is usually caused by degeneration in the cerebral cortex, the part of the brain responsible for thoughts,    memories, actions, and personality. Death of brain cells in this region leads to the cognitive impairments that characterise dementia. Causes of dementia include head injury, brain tumours, infections, hormone disorders, metabolic disorders, hypoxia, nutritional deficiencies, drug abuse, or chronic alcoholism. Unfortunately, most disorders associated with dementia are progressive (inducing a gradual decline of functioning), degenerative (i.e. getting steadily worse over time), and irreversible. The two major degenerative causes of dementia are Alzheimer's disease (the progressive loss of nerve cells without known cause) and vascular dementia (i.e. loss of brain function due to a series of small strokes). Multiple neuropathologic processes may underlie dementia, including both neurodegenerative diseases and vascular disease.   Dementia is most common in elderly individuals, with advancing age being the strongest risk factor.

 

  • Symptoms of Dementia
  • Mixed dementia
  • Stroke & Dementia
  • Causes of Dementia
  • Treatments for Dementia

Related Conference of Dementia

Dementia Conference Speakers