Disaster Mitigation

The sustainability of coastal tourism destinations depends partly on their ability to adapt planning and management practices to the impacts of climate change and also to increase their ability to effectively manage natural disasters. Climate change could affect coastal areas in a variety of ways. Coasts are sensitive to sea level rise, changes in the frequency and intensity of storms, increases in precipitation, and warmer ocean temperatures. Climate change may require new approaches to managing land, water, waste, and ecosystems. Climate change will likely bring heavier rainfall and more precipitation to some coastal areas. Coastal zones and the infrastructure are the areas directly impacted by Tsunamis and the climatic change. There should be a Hazard assessment planning and information on Tsunamis, storm surges like cyclones, Hurricanes and typhoons. Geography and remote sensing plays a key role in analysing the impact and recovery from coastal revetment on tsunami run-up, Ecological restoration and simulation by reproducing storm surges. Increase the operational capacity of local communities in coastal tourism destinations to respond in emergencies caused by natural disasters; support the adaptation efforts of these communities to climate change; and reduce the impacts of natural disasters to local communities in coastal tourism destinations.

  • Climate change mitigation
  • Landslide mitigation
  • Flood mitigation
  • Hurricane mitigation

Related Conference of Disaster Mitigation

Disaster Mitigation Conference Speakers