DNA, Protein and Toxoid Vaccines

Scientists take many approaches to designing vaccines against a microbe. These choices are typically based on fundamental information about the microbe, such as how it infects cells and how the immune system responds to it, as well as practical considerations, such as regions of the world where the vaccine would be used. A DNA vaccine against a microbe would evoke a strong antibody response to the free-floating antigen secreted by cells, and the vaccine also would stimulate a strong cellular response against the microbial antigens displayed on cell surfaces. The DNA vaccine couldn’t cause the disease because it wouldn’t contain the microbe, just copies of a few of its genes. In addition, DNA vaccines are relatively easy and inexpensive to design and produce. Inactivated vaccines can be composed of either whole viruses or bacteria, or fractions of either. Fractional vaccines are either protein-based or polysaccharide-based.

Protein-based vaccines include toxoids (inactivated bacterial toxin) and subunit or subvirion products. When the immune system receives a vaccine containing a harmless toxoid, it learns how to fight off the natural toxin. The immune system produces antibodies that lock onto and block the toxin. Vaccines against diphtheria and tetanus are examples of toxoid vaccines.

  • Plasmid vectors & Delivery methods
  • Diphtheria and tetanus toxoids usage in paediatrics
  • Bacterial Toxins and Immunology
  • Diphtheria and tetanus toxoids usage in paediatrics

DNA, Protein and Toxoid Vaccines Conference Speakers

Recommended Sessions

Related Journals

Are you interested in