Drug Designing Techniques

Drug delivery systems control the rate at which a drug is released and the location in the body where it is released. Some systems can control both.

Historically, clinicians have attempted to direct their interventions to areas of disease or areas at risk of disease. Depending on the medication, the way it is administered and how our body responds, side effects sometimes occur. These side effects can vary greatly from person to person in type and severity. For example, an oral medication for seasonal allergies can cause unwanted drowsiness or upset stomach.

Administering medications locally rather than systemically (affecting the entire body) is a common way of decreasing side effects and drug toxicity while maximizing the impact of treatment. A topical antibacterial ointment (used on the skin) for a localized infection or a cortisone injection in a painful joint may avoid some of the systemic side effects of these medications. There are other ways to achieve specific drug administration, but some medications can only be administered systemically.

Drug delivery systems are technologies designed for targeted administration and / or controlled release of therapeutic agents.

  • Drug Delivery using Nanotechnology

  • Drug carrier

  • Neural drug delivery systems

  • Acoustic targeted drug delivery

  • Thin film drug delivery

  • Other Controlled Drug Delivery Systems

  • Liposomal and Target Delivery System

  • Beaded Delivery Systems

  • Identification and validation of (emerging) drug targets

  • Strategies for drug delivery to the brain

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