Fetal and Maternal Physiology

Fetal developmental potential is determined at the moment of conception by genetic inheritance. However, this development is modulated by environmental factors. It is important to recognize that both, the mother and the fetus, actively participate in the maintenance of the physiological intrauterine environment. Unfortunately, the fetus is not entirely protected from harmful influences of the external factors. By altering the intrauterine environment, these factors can have a long-term effect on fetal health.
Maternal physiological changes in pregnancy are the adaptations during pregnancy that a woman’s body undergoes to accommodate the growing embryo or fetus. These physiologic changes are entirely normal, and include behavioral (brain), cardiovascular (heart and blood vessel), hematologic (blood), metabolic, renal (kidney), posture, and respiratory (breathing) changes. Increases in blood sugar, breathing, and cardiac output are all expected changes that allow a pregnant woman’s body to facilitate the proper growth and development of the embryo or fetus during the pregnancy. The pregnant woman and the placenta also produce many other hormones that have a broad range of effects during the pregnancy.

  • Placental Physiology
  • Physiology of Pregnancy
  • Weight Gain and Pregnancy
  • Fetal Behavior
  • First Trimester-Maternal
  • Eclampsia and Preclampsia
  • Ultrasound Assisted – Intrauterine Therapy

Related Conference of Fetal and Maternal Physiology

Fetal and Maternal Physiology Conference Speakers