Food Spoilage and Waste Management

\r\n Food waste and loss is a large and increasingly urgent problem and is particularly acute in developing countries where food loss reduces income by at least 15% for 470 million smallholder farmers and downstream value chain actors. Food loss (spoilage) receives less media visibility than food waste. Food loss is associated with developing world issues within the food supply chain (such as storage, refrigeration and transportation), while food waste is discussed in terms of developed countries that throw out already‐processed foods. The wastage of food becoming such a serious issue that it could as well be made a crime, it's high time we adopt measures to curb the problem. Cross-contamination can make food can become unusable. To avoid that Separating the food storage areas and food preparation areas is a necessity that needs to be adopted. Ecosystem impacts of food wastage are greater in areas where production is more resource intensive, and over half of these impacts are addressable across the developed world. In the United States alone, the 34 million metric tons of food waste is one seventh of landfill mass and emits methane as damaging as adding 4 million cars to the road. Waste prevention includes activities that avoid waste generation, for instance, reduction of food surplus, whereas waste management includes the options available to deal with food waste once it has been generated, such as composting and anaerobic digestion. We can reduce the food waste by following the food waste hierarchy: Prevention, re-use, recycle, recovery and disposal.

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