Gastrointestinal Cancer: Pathogenesis

Pathogenesis of Colorectal Cancer: Sporadic (Nonhereditary) Colorectal Cancer is detected through screening procedures or when the patient presents with symptoms. Screening is important for prevention and should be a part of routine care for adults over the age of 50 who are at low-risk. High-risk individuals (those who are with previous colon cancer, those who have family history of colon cancer, and those who have inflammatory bowel disease or history of colorectal polyps) require careful follow-up. Major advances have been made in our understanding of molecular events leading to the formation of adenomatous polyps and cancer most of the colorectal cancers are sporadic.

Despite a few breakthroughs in therapy for advanced disease in the recent years, the overall prognosis for the majority of patients with pancreatic cancer is rather dismal, and therefore, more effective treatment options are being desperately sought. The practical goals of management are to improve the cure rates for patients with resectable disease, achieve a higher conversion rate of locally advanced tumor into potentially resectable disease, and finally, prolong the overall survival for those who develop metastatic disease. Our understanding of the complex genetic alterations, the implicated molecular pathways, and the role of desmoplastic stroma in pancreatic cancer tumorigenesis has increased several folds in the recent years. This review will summarize the existing treatment approaches for this devastating disease and also discuss the promising therapeutic approaches that are currently in different stages of clinical development. 

  • Pancreatic and Colorectal Cancer practice
  • Pancreactic and Colorectal Cancer practice management
  • Pancreactic and Colorectal Cancer practice management Software

Related Conference of Gastrointestinal Cancer: Pathogenesis

Gastrointestinal Cancer: Pathogenesis Conference Speakers