General Practice and Cardiology

From 2001 through 2010, the percentage of adults with multiple chronic conditions rose from 22% up to 25%. Because the adult population is around 70 million, this seemingly small increase represents over 2 million additional adults with multiple chronic conditions. Overall 87 percent are recruiting cardiologists during the next 24 months. A Recent study finds that between 1981 – 2000 coronary heart disease (CHD) dropped by 62 percent among males and by 51 percent among females. Patients managed in general practice were older (mean age 79 years (S.D. 8.5) and more often female than "cardiology patients" (mean age 64 years). Ischaemic heart disease (31 vs. 57%) was more prevalent in "cardiology patients". Additional investigations such as chest radiography (51% vs. 84%), electrocardiography (39% vs. 100%), and (Doppler-) echocardiography (12% vs. 97%) were performed more often in "cardiology patients". Most patients received diuretics (85% vs.79%). Angiotensin converting enzyme inhibitors (40% vs. 76%), beta-blockers (9% vs. 30%), spironolactone (11% vs. 32%), and angiotensin-II-antagonists (6% vs. 13%) were prescribed much more often to "cardiology patients".

 

From 2001 through 2010, the percentage of adults with multiple chronic conditions rose from 22% up to 25%. Because the adult population is around 70 million, this seemingly small increase represents over 2 million additional adults with multiple chronic conditions. Overall 87 percent are recruiting cardiologists during the next 24 months. A Recent study finds that between 1981 – 2000 coronary heart disease (CHD) dropped by 62 percent among males and by 51 percent among females. Patients managed in general practice were older (mean age 79 years (S.D. 8.5) and more often female than "cardiology patients" (mean age 64 years). Ischaemic heart disease (31 vs. 57%) was more prevalent in "cardiology patients". Additional investigations such as chest radiography (51% vs. 84%), electrocardiography (39% vs. 100%), and (Doppler-) echocardiography (12% vs. 97%) were performed more often in "cardiology patients". Most patients received diuretics (85% vs.79%). Angiotensin converting enzyme inhibitors (40% vs. 76%), beta-blockers (9% vs. 30%), spironolactone (11% vs. 32%), and angiotensin-II-antagonists (6% vs. 13%) were prescribed much more often to "cardiology patients".

 

  • Cardiac investigations
  • Cardiomyopathy and Heart Transplant
  • Hypertension
  • Chronic Heart failure
  • Cardiovascular risk reduction

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