Geriatrics and Elder Abuse

Old people are commonly abused by their relatives. 500000 elderly people are believed to be abused at any one time around the world. 46% of people responsible for abuse are related to the person they are abusing, but only 1% who abuse are the primary carer. A quarter of those who abuse are sons and daughters. 78% of abuse is perpetrated against people who are over the age of 70, with 16% of that abuse affecting people over the age of 90. Those between 80 and 89 are the most vulnerable to abuse. Two-thirds of abuse is committed at home. Older adults are also vulnerable to elder abuse - including physical, verbal, psychological, financial and sexual abuse; abandonment; neglect; and serious losses of dignity and respect. Current evidence suggests that 1 in 10 older people experience elder abuse. Elder abuse can lead not only to physical injuries, but also to serious, sometimes long-lasting psychological consequences, including depression and anxiety. Elderly abuse is one of the main problems for the aging population. Numerous elderly grown-ups are mishandled in their own homes, in relatives' homes, and even in offices in charge of their care. Abusers of older adults are both women and men, and may be family members, friends, or “trusted others.” In general, elder abuse is a term referring to any knowing, intentional, or negligent act by a caregiver or any other person that causes harm or a serious risk of harm to a vulnerable adult. Follow Geriatrics Conferences and Gerontology Conferences for more updates.

  • Geriatrics and Physical Abuse
  • Geriatrics and Emotional Abuse
  • Geriatrics and Financial Abuse
  • Geriatrics and Verbal Abuse
  • Geriatrics and Elderly Neglect
  • Geriatrics and Mistreatment
  • Geriatrics and Psychological Abuse
  • Geriatrics and Institutional Abuse
  • Geriatrics and Rights Abuse

Related Conference of Geriatrics and Elder Abuse

Geriatrics and Elder Abuse Conference Speakers