Geriatrics and Nutrition

Health-conscious elderly consumers are turning to products that aim to promote better health, longevity and stave off chronic diseases, as they lead longer, more affluent lives.  The clinical nutrition market was valued at USD40.5Bn in 2015, and is expected to reach USD55.9 Bn by 2022, expanding at a CAGR of 4.6% from 2016 to 2022. The number geriatric individuals are on a perpetual rise. Loss of appetite and chronic diseases are common in this age group, thus affecting the ideal nutrition intake and absorption respectively. With the increasing population of baby boomers, spending on clinical nutrition is anticipated to increase. Due to weak digestive system at older age, it is difficult for human body to absorb all the required nutrients from food. Among geriatric population, loss of appetite is considered to be the most common problem. Due to this, the population of baby boomers does not get the sufficient amount of nutrients. In order to get sufficient amount of nutrients, the dependency of the geriatric population towards clinical nutrition support is increasing. During old age, energy requirements are less as the Basal Metabolic Rate (BMR) starts decreasing from the age of 35. The requirement of energy reduces at the rate of about 5% to 20% between the age of 35 to 70 years. While protein, minerals and vitamins requirements remain unchanged, higher intake of minerals and vitamins especially calcium, iron and B complex vitamins may help. These aid the processes of digestion, absorption and utilization as they do not function at an optimal level. Giving oral nutritional supplements for 90 days after leaving hospital could reduce death rates for older malnourished patients with a heart or lung disease by 50%, according to a study published in Clinical Nutrition. Geriatric nutrition applies nutrition principles to delay effects of aging and disease, to aid in the management of the physical, psychological, and psychosocial changes commonly associated with growing old. Physiological changes take place with increasing age hence the nutritional requirements also change accordingly. During old age, energy requirements are less as the Basal Metabolic Rate (BMR) starts decreasing from the age of 35. The requirement of energy reduces at the rate of about 5% to 20% between the age of 35 to 70 years. While protein, minerals and vitamins requirements remain unchanged, higher intake of minerals and vitamins especially calcium, iron and B complex vitamins may help. These aid the processes of digestion, absorption and utilization as they do not function at an optimal level. To have more updates follow Elderly Care Conferences.

  • Oral Nutrition Supplements
  • Nutrition Intervention in Specific Diseases
  • Obesity in Older People
  • Diet Enrichment

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