Haematologic Oncology

Blood malignancies are forms of cancer that begins in the cells of blood-forming tissue, such as the bone marrow, or in the cells of the immune system. Examples of hematologic cancer are acute and chronic leukaemia, lymphomas, multiple myeloma and myelodysplastic syndromes. Myeloproliferative neoplasms, or MPNs, are hematologic cancers that arise from malignant hematopoietic myeloid progenitor cells in the bone marrow, such as the precursor cells of red cells, platelets and granulocytes. The other types of Blood Malignancies also include sarcoma, lymphodema, Non-Hodgkin lymphoma (NHL) and lymphoma, lymphoid cancer, bone marrow cancer.

Blood cancer can produce a variety of symptoms, or none at all. In some cases, blood cancer can be life threatening, especially if severe infections or uncontrollable bleeding occur. Many blood cancers are more common among older adults. Some tend to run in families. Certain infections also appear to increase the risk of some blood cancers, as does a weakened immune system. Exposure to certain chemicals or radiation & chemotherapy can also be a big cause for blood malignancies.

  • Leukemia
  • Myeloma
  • Sarcoma
  • Myelodysplastic Syndrome
  • Myeloproliferative Neoplasms
  • Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma (NHL)
  • Bone Marrow Cancer
  • Childhood Haematological Cancers

Related Conference of Haematologic Oncology

Haematologic Oncology Conference Speakers