Heart Failure

Heart failure (HF) sometimes known as congestive heart failure is a common condition that develops after the heart muscle doesn't pump blood as well as it should. Certain conditions, such as narrowed arteries in your heart (coronary artery disease) or high blood pressure, gradually leave your heart too weak or stiff to fill and pump efficiently or weakened by diseases of the heart including heart attacks and other medical conditions. Heart failure occurs when the main pumping chambers of your heart (the ventricles) may become stiff and not fill properly between beats especially during increased activity or under stress. In addition, the heart muscle may become damaged or weakened and couldn’t relax properly to accommodate the flow of blood back from the lungs to the heart. These flaws in heart function can cause fluid to back up in your lungs and in other parts of your body such as your ankles. The congestion in your lungs and lack of oxygen may make you feel tired and short of breath. Sometimes the fluid in your lungs can accumulate to the point where it can cause a life-threatening condition called acute pulmonary edema, requiring emergency treatment.

  • Left-sided heart failure
  • Right-sided heart failure
  • Congestive heart failure
  • Predictors and markers of heart failure outcome
  • Heart failure in children and adolescents
  • Implantable cardio verter-defibrillator (ICD)
  • Cardiac resynchronization therapy (CRT)
  • Heart transplantation
  • Coronary artery bypass
  • Heart transplantation

Related Conference of Heart Failure

Heart Failure Conference Speakers