Hereditary of diabetes

The two most common forms of diabetes are type 1 diabetes (T1D, previously known as insulin-dependent diabetes or IDDM) and type 2 diabetes (T2D, previously known as non-insulin-dependent diabetes or NIDDM). Both are caused by a combination of genetic and environmental risk factors. However, there are other rare forms of diabetes that are directly inherited. These include maturity-onset diabetes in the young (MODY), and diabetes due to mutations in mitochondrial DNA. All forms of diabetes have very serious effects on health. In addition to the consequences of abnormal metabolism of glucose (e.g., hyperlipidemia, glycosylation of proteins, etc.), there are a number of long-term complications associated with the disease. These include cardiovascular, peripheral vascular, ocular, neurologic and renal abnormalities, which are responsible for morbidity, disability and premature death in young adults. Furthermore, the disease is associated with reproductive complications causing problems for both mothers and their children. Although improved glycemic control may decrease the risk of developing these complications, diabetes remains a very significant cause of social, psychological and financial burdens in populations worldwide.

  • Mitochondrial DNA mutations
  • Defects in proinsulin conversion
  • Insulin gene mutations
  • Insulin receptor mutations
  • Genetic-lifestyle interactions in the development and prevention of diabetes
  • Recent advances in genetics of diabetes
  • Diabetes in specific ethnic groups

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Hereditary of diabetes Conference Speakers