HIV and bone damage

According to one estimate, bone loss may be up to three times more common overall among people with HIV than in the general population.1 Many of the traditional risk factors for osteoporosis, such as low testosterone levels, low body weight, smoking, and drinking alcohol, are also more common in the HIV-positive population and likely contribute to increased prevalence of osteoporosis and osteopenia. Bones are the foundation of our bodies; without healthy bones, we can become vulnerable to poor overall health. People with HIV are susceptible to bone loss, and to a condition called osteoporosis that may lead to fractures. In addition, as people with HIV are living longer due to effective antiretroviral therapy, bone complications may worsen as a result of aging and long-term HIV disease. Aging, antiretroviral drugs, traditional bone loss risk factors, and lifestyle all contribute to bone deterioration in the setting of HIV

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