Homeopathy

Homeopathy, devised in the late 18th century by German physician Samuel Hahnemann, is based on the principle that 'like cures like'. According to this principle, a substance that can produce a certain set of symptoms in a healthy person will cause similar symptoms to disappear in a sick person, when given in a highly diluted form. Homeopathic medicines are aimed to direct and stimulate the body’s self-regulatory mechanisms.


A second principle in homeopathy is individualization of treatment for the patient. The characteristics of the chosen medicine should be as similar as possible to the characteristics of the illness in the patient. This closest match is called the ‘simillimum’. Similarity may be at the ‘whole person’ level, taking into account the symptoms and signs of the disease, the patient’s physical build, personality, temperament and genetic predispositions. This high level of individualization is not always required: ‘similarity’ may be at a more specific, local level, especially in the treatment of acute conditions.

 

A third principle is the use of the minimum dose. The doses used in homeopathy range from those that are similar in concentration to some conventional medicines to very high dilutions containing no material trace of the starting substance – the latter are referred to as ‘ultra-molecular’ dilutions. Vigorous shaking of the solution together with impact or ‘elastic collision’ (known as succussion) during the manufacturing process is a key element in the production of homeopathic medicines.

Homeopathy, devised in the late 18th century by German physician Samuel Hahnemann, is based on the principle that 'like cures like'. According to this principle, a substance that can produce a certain set of symptoms in a healthy person will cause similar symptoms to disappear in a sick person, when given in a highly diluted form. Homeopathic medicines are aimed to direct and stimulate the body’s self-regulatory mechanisms.


A second principle in homeopathy is individualization of treatment for the patient. The characteristics of the chosen medicine should be as similar as possible to the characteristics of the illness in the patient. This closest match is called the ‘simillimum’. Similarity may be at the ‘whole person’ level, taking into account the symptoms and signs of the disease, the patient’s physical build, personality, temperament and genetic predispositions. This high level of individualization is not always required: ‘similarity’ may be at a more specific, local level, especially in the treatment of acute conditions.

 

A third principle is the use of the minimum dose. The doses used in homeopathy range from those that are similar in concentration to some conventional medicines to very high dilutions containing no material trace of the starting substance – the latter are referred to as ‘ultra-molecular’ dilutions. Vigorous shaking of the solution together with impact or ‘elastic collision’ (known as succussion) during the manufacturing process is a key element in the production of homeopathic medicines.

    Related Conference of Homeopathy

    May 30-31, 2018

    3rdWorld Congress on Traditional and Complementary Medicine

    Auckland, New Zealand
    September 24-25, 2018

    International Conference and Expo on Natural Medicine & Products

    Montreal | Quebec | Canada
    July 25-26, 2018

    3rd International Conference and Expo on Holistic Medicine and Nursing

    Vancouver | British Columbia | Canada
    October 17-18, 2018

    International Conference on Complementary & Alternative Medicine

    Las Vegas | Nevada | USA
    September 17-18, 2018 |

    4th World Yoga & Natural Therapies Congress

    San Diego | California | USA
    September 24-25, 2018

    5th World Congress on Traditional & Alternative Medicine

    September 24-25, 2018 Montreal | Quebec | Canada

    Homeopathy Conference Speakers