Hormones & Steroids

Hormones are chemical messengers that have diverse chemical structures including eicosanoids, steroids, amino acid derivatives, peptides, and proteins that are secreted into the blood, which carries them to organs and tissues of the body to exert their functions. They are essential for every activity of life, including the processes of such as digestion, metabolism, respiration, tissue function, sensory perception, sleep, excretion, lactation, stress, growth and development, movement, reproduction, and mood. Many hormones, such as neurotransmitters, are active in more than one physical process.

Hormones are chemical messengers that are secreted directly into the blood, which carries them to organs and tissues of the body to exert their functions. Endocrine glands, which are special groups of cells, make hormones. The major endocrine glands are the pituitary, pineal, thymus, thyroid, adrenal glands, and pancreas.

A steroid hormone is a steroid that acts as a hormone and can be grouped into five groups on the basis of receptors to which they bind: glucocorticoids, mineralocorticoids, androgens, estrogens, and progestogens.

  • Origin and Synthesis
  • Hormone Interactions with Receptors
  • Thyroid Physiology
  • Physiology of Adrenal Gland
  • Pancreatic Physiology
  • Pituitary Gland Physiology
  • Pineal Gland Physiology

Related Conference of Hormones & Steroids

Hormones & Steroids Conference Speakers