Hypertension, Stress and Stroke

Cardiovascular reactivity reflects underlying sympathetic nervous system activation and has been shown to vary according to individual characteristics (eg, personality factors, emotions), environmental exposures (eg, job stress, socioeconomic adversity), interpersonal and social contexts and interactions, and genetic predispositions to disease (eg, positive family history of hypertension or heart disease).Typically, this sympathetic hyperreactivity is manifest as excessive blood pressure (BP) or heart rate responses to psychological or behavioral stressors or stressful situations. Several human and animal studies support the hypothesis that exaggerated hemodynamic or cardiovascular reactivity to stress contributes to elevations in BP, carotid atherosclerosis, and coronary artery disease.

Cardiovascular reactivity reflects underlying sympathetic nervous system activation and has been shown to vary according to individual characteristics (eg, personality factors, emotions), environmental exposures (eg, job stress, socioeconomic adversity), interpersonal and social contexts and interactions, and genetic predispositions to disease (eg, positive family history of hypertension or heart disease).Typically, this sympathetic hyperreactivity is manifest as excessive blood pressure (BP) or heart rate responses to psychological or behavioral stressors or stressful situations. Several human and animal studies support the hypothesis that exaggerated hemodynamic or cardiovascular reactivity to stress contributes to elevations in BP, carotid atherosclerosis, and coronary artery disease.

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