Microbial Biotechnology: Protein Engineering and Enzymology

Industrial microbiology is primarily associated with the commercial exploitation of microorganisms, and involves processes and products that are of major economic, environmental and gregarious consequentiality throughout the world. There are two key aspects of industrial microbiology, the first relating to engenderment of valuable microbial products via fermentation processes. These include traditional fermented foods and beverages, such as bread, potation, cheese and wine, which have been engendered for thousands of years. In additament, over the last hundred years or so, microorganisms have been further employed in the engenderment of numerous chemical feedstock, energy sources, enzymes, aliment ingredients and pharmaceuticals. The second aspect is the role of microorganisms in providing accommodations, particularly for waste treatment and pollution control, which utilizes their abilities to degrade virtually all natural and man-made products. However, such activities must be controlled while these materials are in utilization, otherwise consequent bio deterioration leads to major economic loses, and Industrial microorganisms are mundanely cultivated under rigorously controlled conditions developed to optimize the magnification of the organism or engenderment of a target microbial product. The synthesis of microbial metabolites is conventionally tightly regulated by the microbial cell. Consequently, in order to obtain high yields, the environmental conditions that trigger regulatory mechanisms, particularly repression and feedback inhibition, must be evaded. Fermentations are performed in astronomically immense fermenters often with capacities of several thousand litres. These range from simple tanks, which may be stirred or unstirred, to intricate integrated systems involving varying levels of computer control. The fermenter and associated pipework, etc., must be constructed of materials, conventionally stainless steel, that can be perpetually sterilized and that will not react adversely with the microorganisms or with the target products. The mode of fermenter operation (batch, victualed-batch or perpetual systems), the method of its aeration and agitation, where indispensable, and the approach taken to process scale-up have major influences on fermentation performance.
  • New approaches in enzyme and microbial technology
  • Post-translational modifications: Protein folding
  • Amino acid modifications
  • Protein targeting
  • Protein turnover
  • Commercial enzymes of industrial standards
  • Protein identification and validation
  • Protein profiling and designer proteins
  • Recombinant protein expressions
  • Function prediction methods
  • Pharmacogenomics and pharmacoproteomics
  • In-silico tools to analyze proteins
  • Algorithms and fast profiling

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