Multimedia Computing and Communications

Multimedia computing is the key to developing and maintaining action-oriented software. The computer you’re using right now has come a long way from the earliest models. Thanks to the talents of those in the field of multimedia computing, the capabilities of computers — from animation to Web design, from audio and video compression to instant messaging — have expanded at a remarkable rate, and there’s no end in sight. You can become an integral part of this phenomenon. The program includes basic computing background, mathematical training especially geared to multimedia design and production, and courses in multimedia computing and digital arts. You’ll be instructed by a faculty of almost 30 full-time professors in one of the largest college computer and information science departments in the metropolitan New York area. And with more than 1,000 computers available for your use on campus, you’ll always find a place to practice and hone the skills that will make you a leader in this burgeoning field.

Multimedia computing is the key to developing and maintaining action-oriented software. The computer you’re using right now has come a long way from the earliest models. Thanks to the talents of those in the field of multimedia computing, the capabilities of computers — from animation to Web design, from audio and video compression to instant messaging — have expanded at a remarkable rate, and there’s no end in sight. You can become an integral part of this phenomenon. The program includes basic computing background, mathematical training especially geared to multimedia design and production, and courses in multimedia computing and digital arts. You’ll be instructed by a faculty of almost 30 full-time professors in one of the largest college computer and information science departments in the metropolitan New York area. And with more than 1,000 computers available for your use on campus, you’ll always find a place to practice and hone the skills that will make you a leader in this burgeoning field.

While the last decade has seen an incredible explosion of multimedia content on the Web, our ability to index, search, and navigate these huge collections has also dramatically increased. Most multimedia search and indexing schemes rely on metadata, such as tags and anchor text, as seen on websites such as Flickr and YouTube. Another popular way to index photographs is by geo-location, since users can browse related photos and find visual information of interest. However, simply locating photos on a map with push-pins does not provide a particularly intuitive way to navigate related photos. A third class of techniques relies on visual similarity, which, while useful, is still a very challenging problem to solve.

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