Neurodegeneration and Aging Disorders

A Neurodegenerative disease includes Alzheimer's, Huntington's, Parkinson's, and the prion maladies, are genetically and pathologically linked to aberrant protein aggregation. AD, the most common type of dementia, is typically sporadic; however, rare mutations in several genes confer early onset. Release of the aggregation-prone peptides Aβ1–40 and Aβ1–42 by endoproteolysis of the amyloid precursor protein (APP) is associated with AD through an unknown mechanism that appears to be associated with Aβ aggregation. Typically, individuals who carry AD-linked mutations present with clinical symptoms during their fifth or sixth decade, while sporadic cases appear after the seventh decade. Although aggregation-mediated neurodegeneration emerges late in life, it is unclear whether this late onset is mechanistically linked to the aging process. The Pathophysiology of neurodegeneration is familial amyotrophic lateral sclerosis. Amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) is a progressive neurodegenerative disorder of the motor neurons in the spinal cord, brainstem, and motor cortex.

 

  • Common Neurodegenerative Disorders
  • Mechanisms of neurodegenerative diseases
  • Neurodegenerative disease
  • Advances in Neurodegenerative
  • Advances in Neurodegenerative
  • Novel Insights for Parkinson disease
  • Schizophrenia & Mental Health
  • Dementia and Apathy

Related Conference of Neurodegeneration and Aging Disorders

Neurodegeneration and Aging Disorders Conference Speakers