Neurodegenerative disorders and Stroke

Neurodegeneration is the advanced loss of structure or function of neurons, including death of neurons. Several neurodegenerative diseases – including amyotrophic lateral sclerosis, Parkinson's disease, Alzheimer's disease, and Huntington's disease – occur as a result of neurodegenerative processes. Such syndromes are incurable, resulting in progressive degeneration and/or death of neuron cells. Discovering these resemblances offers hope for therapeutic advances that could ameliorate many diseases simultaneously.

A stroke is a medical state in which poor blood flow to the brain results in cell death. There are two main forms of stroke: ischemic, due to lack of blood flow, and hemorrhagic, due to bleeding. Symbols and symptoms of a stroke may include an inability to move or feel on one side of the body, problems understanding or speaking, dizziness, or loss of vision to one side. If symptoms last less than one or two hours it is known as a transient ischemic attack (TIA) or mini-stroke. A hemorrhagic stroke may also be associated with a severe headache. Long-term complications may include pneumonia or loss of bladder control.

  • Signs and symptoms
  • Genetics
  • PCD
  • Protein misfolding
  • Programmed cell death
  • Transglutaminase
  • Thrombotic stroke
  • Silent stroke
  • Embolic stroke
  • Amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS)

Related Conference of Neurodegenerative disorders and Stroke

Neurodegenerative disorders and Stroke Conference Speakers