Ocean Data Management

Ocean information is important for delivering a range of safety, economic and environmental benefits, underpinning the blue economy and for observations, modelling and analysis of marine and ocean variables to support operational ocean services worldwide. The means to collect and use ocean data constitutes a significant business enterprise and one in which the United States is an acknowledged world leader. The objective is to raise visibility and awareness of the sector’s economic importance and to determine the degree of private sector engagement with NOAA and the US IOOS program and provides accurate descriptions of the present state of the oceans, including living resources; continuous forecasts of the future conditions of the sea for as far ahead as possible, and the basis for forecasts of climate change.

Ocean information is important for delivering a range of safety, economic and environmental benefits, underpinning the blue economy and for observations, modelling and analysis of marine and ocean variables to support operational ocean services worldwide. The means to collect and use ocean data constitutes a significant business enterprise and one in which the United States is an acknowledged world leader. The objective is to raise visibility and awareness of the sector’s economic importance and to determine the degree of private sector engagement with NOAA and the US IOOS program and provides accurate descriptions of the present state of the oceans, including living resources; continuous forecasts of the future conditions of the sea for as far ahead as possible, and the basis for forecasts of climate change.

Ocean acidification data can generally be classified as either physio-chemical or biological.  Physio-chemical parameters include, among others, pCO2 (measurement of carbon dioxide gas both in the air and dissolved in seawater), pH, total alkalinity, total inorganic carbon, temperature, salinity, dissolved oxygen and current speed.

  • New technologies in long-term ocean observations
  • Molecular monitoring systems: promises and challenges for long-term observations
  • Dealing with the challenges of managing biodiversity data
  • Oceanographic instrumentation and sensors
  • Current measurement technology
  • Data visualization
  • Marine GIS and data fusion
  • Data assimilation

Related Conference of Ocean Data Management

September 20-21, 2017

3rd World Congress on GIS and Remote Sensing

Charlotte, North Carolina, USA
November 8-9, 2017

2nd International Convention on Geophysics and Geotechnics

Las Vegas, Nevada, USA
November 8-9, 2017

2nd International Convention on Geosciences and Remote Sensing

Las Vegas, Nevada, USA
November 16-17, 2017

World Congress On Marine Science

Atlanta, Georgia, USA
Dec 4-5, 2017

Annual Congress on Soil Sciences

Madrid, Spain

Ocean Data Management Conference Speakers

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