Ozone Depletion

The ozone layer is a layer in Earth's atmosphere which contains for the most part high unions of ozone (O3). This layer absorbs 93-99% of the sun's high repeat splendid light, which is perhaps hurting to life on earth. More than 91% of the ozone in Earth's atmosphere is accessible here. It is generally arranged in the lower portion of the stratosphere from around 10 km to 50 km above Earth; however the thickness changes at times and topographically. The ozone layer was found in 1913 by the French physicists Charles Fabry and Henri Buisson. Its properties were explored in detail by the British meteorologist G. M. B. Dobson, who developed a fundamental spectrophotometer (the Dobson meter) that could be used to measure stratospheric ozone beginning from the most punctual stage. Something close to 1928 and 1958 Dobson developed a general arrangement of ozone checking stations which continues working today. The "Dobson unit", an accommodating measure of the total whole of ozone in a fragment overhead, is named in his regard.

  • Ozone Layer Recover
  • Causes of Ozone Depletion
  • Rocket Launches
  • Evidence for Ozone Depletion
  • Effects on Terrestrial Plants
  • Montreal Protocol
  • Effects on Ultraviolet Radiation

Related Conference of Ozone Depletion

Ozone Depletion Conference Speakers