Palliative care and Nursing

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\r\n Nurses represent the largest group of health-care professionals all over the World. Nurses are a vital resource for ensuring the provision of safe and effective care for the global population. Nurses spend more time with patients and families than any other health professional as they face serious illness. Palliative care refers to the optimization of quality of life for both the patients with serious illness and their families using special measures to anticipate, treat, and prevent suffering. Palliative care can be provided concurrently with curative measures. Concurrent care is different than a traditional hospice model, where curative therapy, or life extending measures such as palliative chemotherapy, generally have ceased. The concurrent model of palliative care may be, particularly important in lower and lower middle-income countries where access to curative care is limited. Like geriatrics and hospice, palliative care generally will use a multidisciplinary team that may be made up of nursing, social work, spiritual care, and medicine to meet the multifaceted needs of patients with serious illness, or who are at the end of life. Many nurses involved in palliative care face the challenge of combining the art of caring and the science of medicine into a cohesive model that reflects compassionate, individualized care regardless of the environment. Palliative care nursing demands intense critical thinking, heightened levels of mental functioning, and the ability to utilize complex palliative nursing skills.

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Related Conference of Palliative care and Nursing

Palliative care and Nursing Conference Speakers