Pediatric Leukemia

\r\n Chronic leukemias are more common in adults than in children, and although they tend to grow more slowly than acute leukemias, they are harder to treat. These chronic leukemias are divided into two types: chronic myelogenous leukemia (CML) and chronic lymphocytic leukemia (CLL). CML is rare in children, but does occur and is treatable in children the same as in adults. CML patients have too many immature white blood cells being produced, and the cells crowd the other healthy blood cells. Juvenile myelomonocytic leukemia (JMML) is a form of leukemia that is neither chronic nor acute and occurs most often in children under the age of four. JMML begins from myeloid cells, but is not as fast-growing as AML or as slow as CML.

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  • Acute lymphoblastic leukemia
  • Acute myelogenous leukemia
  • Chronic myelogenous leukemia
  • Chronic lymphocytic leukemia
  • Juvenile myelomonocytic leukemia

Related Conference of Pediatric Leukemia

Pediatric Leukemia Conference Speakers