Pediatric Transplant Surgery

Organ transplantation is a medical procedure in which an organ is removed from one body and placed in the body of a recipient, to replace a damaged or missing organ. More than 15,000 Pediatric recipients of heart, kidney, or liver transplants have been reported since 1988. Longer survival rates due to advances and innovations in technical and postoperative management have improved the recipients’ quality of life dramatically, resulting in greater involvement of primary care physicians in their care. Organs that have been successfully transplanted include the heart, kidneys, liver, lungs, pancreas, intestine, and thymus. Some organs, like the brain, cannot be transplanted. Tissues include bones, tendons (both referred to as musculoskeletal grafts), cornea, skin, heart valves, nerves and veins. Worldwide, the kidneys are the most commonly transplanted organs, followed by the liver and then the heart.  Cornea and musculoskeletal grafts are the most commonly transplanted tissues; these outnumber organ transplants by more than tenfold.

 

  • Advances in transplantation
  • Liver Transplantation
  • Bone marrow transplantation

Related Conference of Pediatric Transplant Surgery

Pediatric Transplant Surgery Conference Speakers