Perinatal HIV and Breastfeeding

Perinatal HIV transmission is multifactorial and all potential hazard factors must be considered with regards to the planning of transmission in utero, during childbirth or after birth by breastfeeding. Every year, an expected 590,000 babies gain human immunodeficiency infection type 1 HIV disease from their mothers, mostly in developing countries that are unable to implement interventions now standard in the industrialized world. In asset poor settings, the HIV pandemic has disintegrated hard-won gains in infant and child survival. Later clinical preliminary outcomes from global settings propose that short-course antiretroviral regimens could altogether decrease perinatal HIV transmission worldwide if examine discoveries could be translated into practice. One of the real advances in prevention of perinatal transmission was the AIDS Clinical Trials Group 076 preliminary, which demonstrated that antiretroviral treatment with Zidovudine given to the mother amid pregnancy and conveyance, and to the newborn child, decreased transmission by 70%.

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