Tumor Biology

Cancer cells behave as self-regulating cells, growing without control to form tumors. Tumors develop in a series of steps. The first step is hyperplasia, In this step, there are too many cells resulting from uncontrolled cell division. These cells appear normal, but changes have occurred that result in some loss of control of growth. The second step is dysplasia, resulting from further growth, supplemented by abnormal changes to the cells. The third step requires additional changes, which result in cells that are even more abnormal and can now spread over a wider area of tissue. These cells initiate to lose their original function; such cells are called anaplastic. At this stage, because the tumor is still contained within its original location (called in situ) and is not invasive, it is not considered malignant — it is potentially malignant. The last step occurs when the cells in the tumor metastasize, which means that they can invade surrounding tissue, including the bloodstream, and spread to other locations. This is the most severe type of tumor, but not all tumors progress to this point. Non-invasive tumors are said to be benign.

  • Cancer Cell Biology
  • Oncogenes
  • Tumour Immunology
  • Tumour Progression
  • Carcinogenesis & Mutagenesis
  • Tumour Cell Interactions
  • Cancer Cell Pathology

Related Conference of Tumor Biology

Tumor Biology Conference Speakers