alexa Cellulitis | Finland | PDF | PPT| Case Reports | Symptoms | Treatment

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Cellulitis

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  • Cellulitis

    Cellulitis is a spreading bacterial infection of the skin and tissues beneath the skin. Staphylococcus and Streptococcus are the types of bacteria that are usually responsible for cellulitis, although many types of bacteria can cause the condition. Sometimes cellulitis appears in areas where the skin has broken open, such as the skin near ulcers or surgical wounds. Symptoms and signs include redness, tenderness, swelling, and warmth of the affected area. Cellulitis is not contagious

  • Cellulitis

    Injuries that tear the skin Infections after surgery Long-term skin conditions such as eczema or psoriasis Foreign objects in the skin Bone infections underneath the skin. (An example is a long-standing, open wound that is deep enough to expose the bone to bacteria.)

  • Cellulitis

    Rest the area. Elevate the area to help reduce swelling and relieve discomfort. Use over-the-counter pain relievers such as acetaminophen (Tylenol) or ibuprofen (Motrin) to ease the pain, as well as keep your fever down.

  • Cellulitis

    A population-based insurance claims database was used to examine cellulitis incidence, anatomical sites of infection, complicating diagnoses, source of health service, and recurrence rates. Insurance claim files were searched for cellulitis ICD-9-CM codes 681.0-682.9. Complications of cellulitis including erysipelas, lymphadenitis, lymphangitis, and necrotizing fasciitis were also identified by ICD-9-CM codes.

 

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