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Acute Coronary Syndrome

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  • Acute coronary syndrome

     Acute coronary syndrome is a term used for any condition brought on by sudden, reduced blood flow to the heart. Acute coronary syndrome symptoms may include the type of chest pressure that you feel during a heart attack, or pressure in your chest while you're at rest or doing light physical activity (unstable angina). The first sign of acute coronary syndrome can be sudden stopping of your heart (cardiac arrest).

    Typical symptoms

    •Chest pain (angina) that feels like burning, pressure or tightness, Pain elsewhere in the body, such as the left upper arm or jaw (referred pain), Nausea, Vomiting, Shortness of breath (dyspnea),heavy sweating (diaphoresis).

  • Acute coronary syndrome

     Tests and diagnosis

    Electrocardiogram (ECG), Blood tests, Echocardiogram, Chest X-ray, Nuclear scan, Coronary angiogram (cardiac catheterization), Computerized tomography (CT) angiogram, Exercise stress test.

  • Acute coronary syndrome

     Statistics

    We analyzed data collected in a registry of all patients admitted to hospital with ACS in the southwest of Ireland, catchment population 620 525, from March 2003 until March 2007. In the year following implementation of the ban, there was a significant 12% reduction in ACS admissions (177.9 vs 205.9/100,000; 95% confidence interval [CI]: 164.0-185.1, P = 0.002). This reduction was due to fewer events occurring among men (281.5 vs 233.5, P = 0.0011) and current smokers (408 vs 302 admissions, P < 0.0001). There was no change in the rate of admissions for ACS in the following year (174.3/100,000; 95% CI: 164.0-185.1, P > 0.1). However, a further 13% reduction was observed between March 2006 and March 2007 (149.2; 95% CI: 139.7-159.2).

     

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