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Dysthymia

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  • Dysthymia

    It is sometimes also called neurotic depression ,dysthymic disorder, or chronic depression, is a mood disorder consisting of the same cognitive and physical problems as in depression, with less severe but longer-lasting symptoms. Dysthymia often co-occurs with other mental disorders. A "double depression" is the occurrence of episodes of major depression in addition to dysthymia.

  • Dysthymia

    Symptoms: It may include: Sadness or depressed mood most of the day or almost every day. Loss of enjoyment in things that were once pleasurable. Major change in weight (gain or loss of more than 5% of weight within a month) or appetite. Insomnia or excessive sleep almost every day. Being physically restless or rundown in a way that is noticeable by others. Fatigue or loss of energy almost every day. Feelings of hopelessness or worthlessness or excessive guilt almost every day. Problems with concentration or making decisions almost every day. Recurring thoughts of death or suicide, suicide plan, or suicide attempt.

    Diagnosis: To diagnose dysthymia,we have to follow routine physical and psychological examination.

  • Dysthymia

    Treament: Medication and psychotherapy (talk therapy) are the most common treatments for dysthymia. Medication: The medications used for dysthymia are the same ones used to treat major depression. These commonly include fluoxetine (Prozac), sertraline (Zoloft), paroxetine (Paxil), and citalopram (Celexa).

    Epidemology: Globally dysthymia occurs in about 105 million people a year (1.5% of the population). It is slightly more common in women (1.8%) than in men (1.3%).The lifetime prevalence rate of dysthymia in community settings appears to range from 3 to 6% in the United States.

 

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