alexa MRSA [Methicillin Resistant Staphylococcus aureus] | Italy | PDF | PPT| Case Reports | Symptoms | Treatment

OMICS International organises 3000+ Global Conferenceseries Events every year across USA, Europe & Asia with support from 1000 more scientific societies and Publishes 700+ Open Access Journals which contains over 50000 eminent personalities, reputed scientists as editorial board members.

Recommended Conferences

Read more

Recommended Journals

Relevant Topics

MRSA [Methicillin Resistant Staphylococcus Aureus]

  • Share this page
  • Facebook
  • Twitter
  • LinkedIn
  • Google+
  • Pinterest
  • Blogger
  • MRSA [Methicillin Resistant Staphylococcus aureus]

    Pathophysiology: Methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) is a bacterium responsible for several difficult-to-treat infections in humans. It is also called oxacillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (ORSA). Healthy individuals may carry MRSA asymptomatically for periods ranging from a few weeks to many years. Patients with compromised immune systems are at a significantly greater risk of symptomatic secondary infection.
     

  • MRSA [Methicillin Resistant Staphylococcus aureus]

    Statistics:
    The most interesting feature was the recent increase of ST228-MRSA-I over the period 2000-2007 (57%) when compared to the period 1990-1999 (29%), and its stability to date, associated with a decrease of the highly epidemic ST247-MRSA-IA, (23% from 1990 to 1999, 6% from 2000 to 2007).
     

  • MRSA [Methicillin Resistant Staphylococcus aureus]

    Treatment:
    Treatment for MRSA will depends up on the how prevalence it is and also on the type of the infection caused. Mostly Treatment options for MRSA skin and soft tissue infections may include ClindamycinTetracycline drugs, Doxycycline and Minocycline,Trimethoprim and Sulfamethoxazole, Rifampin and Linezolid.
     

  • MRSA [Methicillin Resistant Staphylococcus aureus]

    Major Research: An entirely different approach is phage therapy (e.g., at the Eliava Institute in Georgia). Experimental phage therapy tested in mice had a reported efficacy against up to 95% of tested Staphylococcus isolates.Some in vitro studies with honey have identified components in honey that kill MRSA. Ocean-dwelling living sponges produce compounds that may make MRSA more susceptible to antibiotics.

Expert PPTs

Speaker PPTs

 

High Impact List of Articles

Conference Proceedings

adwords