alexa Plantar fasciitis | Japan | PDF | PPT| Case Reports | Symptoms | Treatment

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Plantar Fasciitis

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  • Plantar fasciitis

    Plantar fasciitis is an inflammation of the plantar fascia that extends from the heel to the toes. In plantar fasciitis, the fascia first becomes irritated and then inflamed, resulting in heel pain. The most common cause of plantar fasciitis relates to faulty structure of the foot. For example, people who have problems with their arches, either overly flat feet or high-arched feet are more prone to developing plantar fasciitis.

  • Plantar fasciitis

    The symptoms of plantar fasciitis include pain on the bottom of the heel and in the arch of the foot, pain that increases over a period of months and worse upon arising. People with plantar fasciitis often describe the pain as worse when they get up in the morning or after they’ve been sitting for long periods of time. After a few minutes of walking the pain decreases, because walking stretches the fascia.

  • Plantar fasciitis

    Stretching is the best treatment for plantar fasciitis. It may help to try to keep weight off your foot until the initial inflammation goes away. Oral non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs such as ibuprofen (Advil, Motrin IB) and naproxen (Aleve) recommended reducing pain and inflammation associated with plantar fasciitis. Wearing supportive shoes that have good arch support and a slightly raised heel reduces stress on the plantar fascia.Although most patients with plantar fasciitis respond to non-surgical treatment, a small percentage of patients may require surgery. If, after several months of non-surgical treatment, you continue to have heel pain, surgery will be considered

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