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ISSN: 2329-6917

Journal of Leukemia
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Journal Impact Factor 1.25*
Submit manuscript at https://www.editorialmanager.com/biomedicaljournals/ or send as an e-mail attachment to the Editorial Office at leukemia@oncologyinsights.org

About the Journal

ICV Value: 64.66

Journal of Leukemia is a peer reviewed medical journal that includes a wide range of fields in Leukemia, Multiple Myeloma, Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia, Acute Myleoid Leukemia, Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia, Chronic Myleloid Leukemia, Hairy Cell Leukemia, Pediatric Leukemia, Leukemia drugs, Stem Cell Transplant, Plasma cell Leukemia, Mast cell Leukemia, Lymphoma Cancer, Lymphoma Symptoms, Spleen cancer, Acute Myelomonocytic Leukemia, Aleukemic Leukemia , Lymphosarcoma, Megakaryocytic Leukemia, Feline Leukemia complex, Epidemiologic studies and other Hematologic malignancies and creates a platform for the authors to make their contribution towards the journal and the editorial office promises peer process for the submitted manuscripts to ensure quality.

Leukemia is one of the best open access journals that aims to publish the most complete and reliable source of information on discoveries and current developments in the mode of Original articles, Review articles, Case reports, Short communications, etc. in the field and provides free online access to the researchers worldwide.

This scholarly open access journal is using Editorial Manager System for online manuscript submission, review and the progress of the article. Editorial board members of Journal of Leukemia or outside experts review manuscripts; at least two independent reviewer’s approval followed by the ditor is required for the acceptance of any citable manuscript.

Submit manuscript at http://www.editorialmanager.com/biomedicaljournals/ or send as an e-mail attachment to the Editorial Office at editor.jlu@omicsinc.com or leukemia@peerreviewedjournals.com

Leukemia

Leukemia is a cancer of the blood cells. Leukemia begins in a cell in the bone marrow. The cell undergoes a change and becomes a type of leukemia cell. Once the marrow cell undergoes a leukemic change, the leukemia cells may grow and survive better than normal cells. Over time, the leukemia cells crowd out or suppress the development of normal cells. The rate at which leukemia progresses and how the cells replace the normal blood and marrow cells are different with each type of leukemia.

It is the most common type of blood cancer and affects 10 times as many adults as children. Most people diagnosed with leukemia are over 50 years old. 

Related Journals of Leukemia
Blood, Blood Disorders & Transfusion, Blood & Lymph, Cancer Clinical Trials, Leukemia, Leukemia Research, Leukemia Research Reports, Blood Reviews, Blood Research, Chemotherapy, Cancer Journal, Cancer Biology & Therapy
 

Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia

Acute lymphocytic leukemia (ALL), also called acute lymphoblastic leukemia, is a cancer that starts from the early version of white blood cells called lymphocytes in the bone marrow (the soft inner part of the bones, where new blood cells are made). The term “acute” means that the leukemia can progress quickly, and if not treated, would probably be fatal within a few months. Lymphocytic means it develops from early (immature) forms of lymphocytes, a type of white blood cell. Acute leukemia requires aggressive, timely treatment.

Related Journals of Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia
Cancer Diagnosis, Cancer Science & Therapy, Archives in Cancer Research, Leukemia Research, Blood Reviews, Critical Reviews in Oncology/Hematology, Seminars in Oncology, Blood Cancer Journal, Medical Oncology
 

Acute Myleoid Leukemia

Acute myeloid leukemia (AML) has many other names, including acute myelocytic leukemia, acute myelogenous leukemia, acute granulocytic leukemia, and acute non-lymphocytic leukemia. “Acute” means that this leukemia can progress quickly if not treated, and would probably be fatal in a few months. “Myeloid” refers to the type of cell this leukemia starts from. Most cases of AML develop from cells that would turn into white blood cells (other than lymphocytes), but some cases of AML develop in other types of blood-forming cells.
AML starts in the bone marrow (the soft inner part of certain bones, where new blood cells are made), but in most cases it quickly moves into the blood. It can sometimes spread to other parts of the body including the lymph nodes, liver, spleen, central nervous system (brain and spinal cord), and testicles. It occurs in both adults and children and affects about 18,000 people each year in the U.S.
 
Related Journals of Acute Myleoid Leukemia
Cancer Clinical Trials, Cancer Medicine & Anti Cancer Drugs, Oncology & Cancer Case Reports, Clinical Lymphoma, Myeloma and Leukemia, Hematological Oncology, International Journal of Clinical Oncology, Acta Oncologica, Cancer Control, Seminars in Oncology
 

Chronic Myleloid Leukemia

Chronic myeloid leukemia (CML), also known as chronic myelogenous leukemia, is a type of cancer that starts in certain blood-forming cells of the bone marrow. In CML, a genetic change takes place in an early (immature) version of myeloid cells - the cells that make red blood cells, platelets, and most types of white blood cells (except lymphocytes). This change forms an abnormal gene called BCR-ABL, which turns the cell into a CML cell. The leukemia cells grow and divide, building up in the bone marrow and spilling over into the blood. In time, the cells can also settle in other parts of the body, including the spleen. CML is a fairly slow growing leukemia, but it can also change into a fast-growing acute leukemia that is hard to treat.

Related Journals of Chronic Myleloid Leukemia
Cancer Diagnosis, Cancer Science & Therapy, Archives in Cancer Research, Cancer Causes & Control, Critical Reviews in Oncology Hematology, Cancer Science, Journal of Surgical Oncology, Cancer Treatment Reviews, Cancer Chemotherapy and Pharmacology, Journal of Leukemia and Lymphoma
 

Hairy Cell Leukemia

Hairy cell leukemia is rare. It occurs mostly in people aged 40-60 and is more common in men than in women. HCL usually develops very slowly. HCL affects a type of white blood cell called a B­‑lymphocyte. When this cell is examined under a microscope, it looks as if it has hair-like outgrowths (projections) on its surface. This is where HCL gets its name from.
In HCL, the abnormal white blood cells also build up in the spleen and cause it to grow. An enlarged spleen may remove normal blood cells from the bloodstream. This can also reduce the number of red blood cells and normal white blood cells. The causes of HCL are unknown. It is not infectious and cannot be passed on to other people.
 
Related Journals of Hairy Cell Leukemia
Blood, Blood Disorders & Transfusion, Blood & Lymph, Cancer Clinical Trials, Journal of Leukemia and Lymphoma, Leukemia and Lymphoma, Seminars in Hematology, Current Opinion in Oncology, Cancer Chemotherapy and Pharmacology, Current Cancer Drug Targets
 

Pediatric Leukemia

Pediatric Leukemia is also called as Juvenile Leukemia and childhood leukemia. Accounts for less than 1% of childhood leukemias Approx. 25-50 children are diagnosed each year in the US Children are usually diagnosed before 2 years old More common in boys than girls Symptoms can take months to develop Usually no symptoms are seen in the early stages Once diagnosed progressive deterioration occurs.

This Leukemia is the most commonly diagnosed cancer in children, accounting for about 30% of all cases. Approximately 1 in 2,000 children will develop it before the age of 15 years.

Related Journals of Pediatric Leukemia
Cancer Clinical Trials, Cancer Medicine & Anti Cancer Drugs, Oncology & Cancer Case Reports, Pediatric Blood and Cancer, Oral Oncology, Molecular Cancer, Cancer Biology & Therapy, Cancer Detection and Prevention, Cancer Journal, Blood Cancer Journal
 

Plasma Cell Leukemia

Plasma cell leukemia (PCL) is a rare and aggressive plasma cell dyscrasia. Patients with PCL have a very poor prognosis with median survival measured in months. PCL can present de novo or following a prodrome of plasma cell myeloma. Patients with PCL tend to present with aggressive clinical features, such as extramedullary disease, bone marrow failure. The treatment of PCL has primarily been palliative, with only a small minority of patients achieving a durable remission. 

Related Journals of Plasma Cell Leukemia
Cancer Diagnosis, Cancer Science & Therapy, Archives in Cancer Research, Advances in Cancer Prevention, Leukemia Research Reports, Cancer Biology & Therapy, Japanese Journal of Clinical Oncology, Molecular Cancer, Molecular Cancer Research, American Journal of Clinical Oncology-cancer Clinical Trials, Leukemia & Lymphoma
 

Mast Cell Leukemia

Mast cell leukemia (MCL) is a very rare form of aggressive systemic mastocytosis accounting for < 1% of all mastocytosis. It may appear de novo or secondary to previous mastocytosis and shares more clinicopathologic aspects with systemic mastocytosis than with acute myeloid leukemia. Symptoms of mast cell activation-involvement of the liver, spleen, peritoneum, bones, and marrow-are frequent.The common phenotypic features of pathologic mast cells encountered in most forms of mastocytosis are unreliable in MCL.

Related Journals of Mast Cell Leukemia
Cancer Surgery, Advances in Cancer Prevention, Chemotherapy: Open Access, Cell Science & Therapy, Leukemia & Lymphoma, Hematological Oncology, Medical and Pediatric Oncology, Seminars in Radiation Oncology, Cancer Treatment Reviews, Cancer Science, Cancer Causes & Control
 

Lymphoma Cancer

Lymphoma is different from leukemia. Each of these cancers starts in a different type of cell. Lymphoma starts in infection-fighting lymphocytes. Leukemia starts in blood-forming cells inside bone marrow. Lymphoma is also not the same as lymphedema, which is a collection of fluid that forms under the skin when lymph nodes are damaged.
There are two main types of lymphoma:
Non-Hodgkin: Most people with lymphoma have this type.
Hodgkin
Non-Hodgkin and Hodgkin lymphoma each affect a different kind of lymphocyte. Every type of lymphoma grows at a different rate and responds differently to treatment.
 
Related Journals of Lymphoma Cancer
Blood & Lymph, Blood, Blood Disorders & Transfusion, Cancer Clinical Trials, Clinical Lymphoma and Myeloma, Journal of Leukemia and Lymphoma, International Journal of Cancer, Cancer Letters, Molecular Cancer Research, BMC Cancer, European Journal of Cancer Prevention, Lymphoma
 

Lymphoma Symptoms

The most common symptom of lymphoma is a painless swelling in a lymph node, usually in the armpit, groin or neck. This is caused by the damaged lymphocytes collecting in that node. The swelling may also ache. Fever, Chills, Unexplained weight loss, These symptoms are nonspecific. This means that they could be caused by any number of conditions unrelated to cancer. For instance, they could be signs of the flu or other viral infection, but in those cases, they would not last very long. In lymphoma, the symptoms persist over time and cannot be explained by an infection or another disease.

Related Journals of Lymphoma Symptoms
Cancer Surgery, Advances in Cancer Prevention, Chemotherapy: Open Access, Blood & Lymph, Leukemia and Lymphoma, Journal of Leukemia and Lymphoma, Oncogene, Seminars in Cancer Biology, Cancer Letters, Cancer Causes and Control, Cancer Immunology and Immunotherapy, Cancer Biology and Therapy, Advances in Cancer Research
 

Acute Myelomonocytic Leukemia

Acute Myelomonocytic Leukemia one of the more common types of acute myelogenous leukemia, characterized by both malignant monocytes and myeloblasts; it usually affects middle aged to older adults, although it affects people of all ages. AML sometimes is caused by chemotherapy or radiation therapy given to treat another cancer.

In AML, immature leukemia cells rapidly accumulate in the bone marrow, destroying and replacing cells that produce normal blood cells. The leukemia cells are released into the bloodstream and are transported to other organs, where they continue to grow and divide. They can form small masses (chloromas) in or just under the skin or gums or in the eyes. There are several subtypes of AML, which are identified based on characteristics of the leukemia cells. 

Related Journals of Acute Myelomonocytic Leukemia
Blood & Lymph, Blood, Blood Disorders & Transfusion, Cancer Clinical Trials, Leukemia and Lymphoma, Seminars in Radiation Oncology, Radiotherapy and Oncology, European Journal of Cancer, Clinical Cancer Research, Cancer Causes & Control, Cancer and Metastasis Reviews
 

Aleukemic Leukemia

Leukemia is a serious disease, a cancer of blood or bone marrow. It is a cancer of white blood cells (WBCs). Abnormal production of leukocytes or white blood cells in the bone marrow leads to leukemia, resulting in several health complications. Aleukemic Leukemia is a leukemia in which the leukocyte count is normal or below normal.

In aleukemic leukemia, increased number of white blood cells is not detected in a blood test. It is a rare type of leukemia. This type of leukemia can also be lymphocytic, monocytic, or myelogenous. It can be seen in patients diagnosed with acute/chronic lymphocytic/meylogenous leukemia and also in prolymphocytic leukemia, and myelodysplastic syndrome. 

Related Journals of Aleukemic Leukemia
Cancer Surgery, Advances in Cancer Prevention, Chemotherapy: Open Access, Blood & Lymph, Leukemia Research, Annals of Oncology, Cancer Letters, Critical Reviews in Oncology Hematology, Cancer Science, Advances in Cancer Research, Acta Oncologica
 

Acute Megakaryocytic Leukemia

Acute megakaryocytic leukemia (AMeL) is a rare form of acute myeloid leukemia (AML). Even if it is a well-known entity, it could be frequently misdiagnosed as acute myelosclerosis. The disease is rare and, due to difficulty in diagnosis, its exact incidence is not known. Reasonably, it may account for approximately 1-2% of all de novo acute myeloid leukemias (AML) in the adult population, but the incidence in the pediatric age group is higher, partly due to an association with Down syndrome. The incidence of this form of AML shows a high variability according to the different reports, that it ranges from 8 to 15% of all acute leukemias. Clinical experience with this rare leukemia remains limited.

Related Journals of Megakaryocytic Leukemia
Advances in Cancer Prevention, Cancer Diagnosis, Cancer Science & Therapy, Archives in Cancer Research, Leukemia, Nature Reviews Cancer, International Journal of Cancer, Cancer Research, Lancet Oncology, Ca-a Cancer Journal for Clinicians
 

Feline Leukemia Complex

Feline leukemia is a cancerous disease caused by feline leukemia virus (FeLV). Feline leukemia is a disease that only affects cats -- it cannot be transmitted to people, dogs, or other animals. FeLV is passed from one cat to another through saliva, blood, and to some extent, urine and feces. The virus does not live long outside the cat’s body -- probably just a few hours. FeLV is a type of virus called a retrovirus.

Only about 3% of cats in single-cat households have the virus, but for cats that spend time outdoors, the rate is much higher. Still, the prevalence of FeLV has decreased over the last 25 years because of vaccines and reliable tests.

Related Journals of Feline Leukemia Complex
Cancer Surgery, Advances in Cancer Prevention, Chemotherapy: Open Access, Blood & Lymph, Molecular Cancer Research, Cancer Cell, Advances in Cancer Research, Cancer Biology and Therapy, Clinical Cancer Research, Cancer
 


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Journal of Leukemia is supporting the 5th World Conference on Cancer Therapy during september 28-30, 2015 Atlanta, USA with the theme of Exploring the Possibilities towards cancer treatment.

Journal Highlights

*2016 Journal Impact Factor was established by dividing the number of articles published in 2014 and 2015 with the number of times they are cited in 2016 based on Google Scholar Citation Index database. If 'X' is the total number of articles published in 2014 and 2015, and 'Y' is the number of times these articles were cited in indexed journals during 2016 then, impact factor = Y/X

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